Introduction to Maple Wood Floors

 

Maple flooring has long been a favorite among hardwood flooring enthusiasts. It is known for its delicate grain and creamy blonde tones which are great for making a clean, uncluttered overall look. If this is the type of style you are going for in your home, here are some things you will want to know in advance.

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Buying Options:

When shopping for maple flooring, there are several buying options available. These include:

Solid maple flooring:

This flooring usually comes in a variety of widths and lengths. It can come pre-finished with planks that have already been treated with stain or sealant, or unfinished.

Engineered maple flooring:

This type of flooring tends to be much thinner, as little as ¼” thick, although this measurement can also vary depending on the manufacturer. However, our line of engineered maple floors comes in at a standard thickness of 5/8”. Due to it being engineered, there are usually larger ranges of color finishes as compared with solid hardwood.

Laminate maple flooring:

This is the least expensive of the three options. Plank widths tend to run around 5” and the range of colors and styles offered are quite wide.

Colors Stains and Textures:

Although maple flooring can look great in its natural state, its porous nature allows it to take stains rather well and it often comes pre-stained by the manufacturer. Different texture finishes are available as well and include hand scraped/distressed, wire brushed and smooth.

To get a better idea of the color stains and textures available, the our line of engineered hardwood floors offer some great maple selections. Below are two of our most popular maple selections:

  NVMA-25  Drift Branch Maple: Light in color, this flooring features a 5/8” thickness, mild hand scraping, natural crevices and mineral streaks.

NVMA-25 Drift Branch Maple: Light in color, this flooring features a 5/8” thickness, mild hand scraping, natural crevices and mineral streaks.

  BSMA-22 Topaz Maple:  Darker in color, this flooring also features a 5/8” thickness. It is smooth with natural crevices and mineral streaks. scraped/distressed, wire brushed and smooth.

BSMA-22 Topaz Maple: Darker in color, this flooring also features a 5/8” thickness. It is smooth with natural crevices and mineral streaks. scraped/distressed, wire brushed and smooth.

 

Hardness and Durability:

Maple flooring has a Jenka hardness ranking of 1450 which makes it relatively hard when compared to oak flooring. This means it is less prone to dents and very durable. On the downside, it is also prone to scratching and should be coated in a polyurethane finish to keep it safe. Overall, it is a good choice for active households as long as it is properly sealed.


Pros and Cons

To sum up, let’s look at some key pros and cons of maple flooring.

It is widely available in a number of colors and finishes, durable, affordable, easy to maintain and can make for a timeless, attractive addition to your home décor.

On the downside, it does react badly to the elements, warping in excessive humidity and turning darker over time due to sun exposure. Using a humidifier and water based sealants can minimize the amount of damage that can be done.

Maple wood flooring is a great investment due to its classic look and durability. Be sure it is installed properly and maintained regularly so that it gives your home the stylish look you’re after for years to come.